Asia

"Will Russia’s Forests Be an Asset or an Obstacle in Climate Fight?"

"New research indicating Russia’s vast forests store more carbon than previously estimated would seem like good news. But scientists are concerned Russia will count this carbon uptake as an offset in its climate commitments, which would allow its emissions to continue unchecked."

"It is the world’s largest forest, and it has been soaking up carbon dioxide from the air at an unprecedented rate. So why are climate campaigners growing anxious about it?

Source: YaleE360, 07/19/2021

Solar Panel Stories Can Shine for Local, Regional Reporters

As the solar panel business resurges, the wide scope of possible regional and local story angles — climate, tech, consumer, business, jobs, air quality and grid reliability — make bright prospects for journalists. The latest TipSheet sets out recent political and market developments, along with more than a dozen story ideas and reporting resources.

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Journalists Team Up To Continue Colleagues’ Work Exposing Mining Risks

Environmental journalists around the world sometimes pay for their work with their freedom, safety or even their lives. The Forbidden Stories network continues the reporting of some of those journalists, and a team there recently produced an award-winning collaboration to investigate troubles at mining giants in Central America, South Asia and East Africa. “The Green Blood Project” in this month’s Inside Story.

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October 11, 2021 to October 24, 2021

UN Biodiversity Conference (COP 15)

This United Nations conference in Kunming, China will convene governments from around the world to agree to a new set of goals for nature over the next decade through the Convention on Biological Diversity post 2020 framework process.

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China Promised To Go Carbon-Neutral By 2060, But Coal Is Still King

"The walls and ceiling of the Nanshan mine shimmer black, carved straight into a 200 million-year-old coal seam running 1,300 feet underground. Black veins of Jurassic-era coal deposits still thread Shanxi province in China's north, enriching public coffers and keeping generations of miners steadily employed."

Source: NPR, 06/16/2021

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