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SEJournal Online is the weekly digital news magazine of the Society of Environmental Journalists.  Subscribe to the e-newsletter here. Send questions, comments, story ideas, articles, news briefs and tips to sejournaleditor@sej.org. Learn more about SEJournal Online.

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Latest SEJournal Issues RSS

October 16, 2019

  • Missed the Society of Environmental Journalists’ annual gathering in Fort Collins? Never fear, for our in-house humorist David Helvarg has herein recounted the “highs” (and paranoid lows). Among them: oddball scientists, strolls in a snow storm, bad burros and beet-based dinners. Plus, the secret strategy behind SEJ’s conference site selection.

  • The latest impeachment scandal engulfing the White House demonstrates how a big story can be triggered by a whistleblower. But it’s not just in the world of politics. Whistleblowers can bring hidden stories into the spotlight in the environment and energy fields too, including one involving Energy Secretary Rick Perry (left). The latest Reporter’s Toolbox looks at how reporters can work smartly with whistleblowers, with advice and resources.

October 9, 2019

  • As the Society of Environmental Journalists heads to Colorado this week for its annual gathering, it’s a good time to consider how to report on the vast public lands throughout the western United States. The latest TipSheet explores the history of conflict over public lands, the stories they yield and the resources needed to better report the issue.

  • A deeply documented investigation revealed serious problems in Illinois’ aging nuclear power plants, and won reporters Brett Chase and Madison Hopkins an outstanding small market investigative reporting award from the Society of Environmental Journalists last year. Chase spoke with SEJournal Online’s “Inside Story” about the “Power Struggle” project, about lessons learned and advice for other reporters. Read the Q&A.

October 2, 2019

  • Compelling pipeline stories can be found throughout the United States, but first you need to know where the pipelines are. The latest Reporter’s Toolbox looks at the best source of pipeline data, which offers a wealth of government information on location, incidents and enforcement. But there are caveats as well.

  • The Detroit River, a key Great Lakes shipping channel, was once the repository of millions of gallons of industrial discharge. But as a new book attests, Detroit’s industrial waterfront has in the last 50 years undergone a remarkable recovery that offers hope for the cleanup of other polluted Rust Belt towns. Read our BookShelf review.

September 25, 2019

  • The politics of federal appropriations is convoluted, but buried within are important local environmental stories. Heading into the upcoming fiscal year, the latest TipSheet explains how the process works and where to find the news. Plus, spotting environmental pork barrel, and what a “minibus” bill is and why it matters.

  • Can consumption in the classroom become a reporting exercise for budding journalists? Our quarterly EJ Academy column explores how collegiate educators can handle sustainability questions. Should students be discouraged from using plastic water bottles? And should faculty use electronic handouts and texts instead of paper copies? Top instructors weigh in.

September 18, 2019

  • Wind turbines are everywhere in the United States these days. And now a growing database allows you to track them down by the thousands so you can better report the burgeoning wind energy beat. The latest Reporter’s Toolbox tells you who’s behind this invaluable database, plus smart ways to use it for your coverage.

  • It’s poisoning fresh waters across the United States, as well as elsewhere in the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa. Blue-green algae is on the rise, lingering later and later into the year. Our new Issue Backgrounder explains the contributing factors behind the potent toxin’s scourge, its societal and public health ramifications, and the many angles and resources to tell the story.

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