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SEJournal Online is the weekly digital news magazine of the Society of Environmental Journalists. SEJ members are automatically subscribed. Non-members may subscribe using the link below. Meanwhile, learn more about SEJournal Online. And send questions, comments, story ideas, articles, news briefs and tips to Editor Adam Glenn at sejournaleditor@sej.org.

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December 2, 2020

  • Automakers are at the heart of the conflict over climate change policy, thanks to the prevalence of transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions. That may now be changing. And not just because of the incoming Biden administration, but also with shifting investment in the future of electric vehicles. A look at how car companies are piloting that path, from the latest Backgrounder. Electric Hummer, anyone?

  • As a young journalist, freelancer Madeline Halpert worried about her late start in the profession. So she took charge of her career path to get a leg up. Check out her six steps for successful advancement in the freelancing field, including self-publishing and building relationships with editors. From the latest Freelance Files.

  • For Boston Globe environment reporter David Abel, a side project shooting video of the 2013 Boston Marathon sealed his passion for nonfiction filmmaking, one that has since yielded four high-profile nature documentaries. In EJ InSight, Abel traces that path and details how he balances his environment reporting and filmmaking. Plus, view images from Abel’s documentary work.

November 25, 2020

  • A rush of last-minute regulatory (and deregulatory) actions are underway in the waning days of the Trump administration. And the latest TipSheet has suggestions not only for how to keep track, but also how to bird-dog the numerous ways the incoming Biden administration might try to reverse Trump’s course.

  • When the New York Times Magazine published “Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change” as its full issue in August 2018, the reaction to Nathaniel Rich’s piece was immediate and polemic. Today, as some analysts speak of Joe Biden’s efforts to position himself as “the climate President,” SEJournal asks Rich to explain his contribution to the public conversation on policy, action and climate.

  • As a new Biden administration prepares for office, WatchDog issues a call for restoring open government. The latest opinion column puts forward a list of 20 recommended actions that include outlawing assault on journalists, clearing FOIA backlogs and counteracting ag-gag laws. Plus, an updated reporter’s Bill of Rights for government press offices.

November 18, 2020

  • The toxic compounds known as PFAS are causing a crisis in the waste and recycling industry, which faces mounting regulation and litigation over handling its presence in the waste stream. One reporter on the PFAS front lines explains the industry’s dilemma, as well as the challenges of covering the story and how a financial prism led to important insights into industry’s response.

  • Large migratory species have been traveling across the North American continent for thousands of years. But the land has been dramatically affected, altering how these big game move about. A new data mapping site for scientists can now help environmental journalists track Western wildlife herds and their health as well. The latest from Reporter’s Toolbox.

November 11, 2020

  • What will a Biden presidency mean for climate and environmental policy if it’s facing the prospect of a GOP-controlled Senate? Quite a bit actually. The latest Backgrounder examines a range of executive actions that the Biden White House could take on energy and the environment. Plus, a look at what’s possible through independent agencies and, yes, bipartisan legislation. But there are a lot of powerful climate actions a Biden administration could take — by executive action alone. Also see headlines on the topic from EJ Today.

  • With wildfire exploding across the West this season, it may not be long before insurance companies worried about houses built along the wildland-urban interface try to raise premiums or drop policies altogether. It’s already happening in California, which is pushing back. Will it happen in your region as well? TipSheet has the backstory, plus a range of reporting resources.

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