Disasters

"Nuclear Rules in Japan Relied on Old Science"

"In the country that gave the world the word tsunami, the Japanese nuclear establishment largely disregarded the potentially destructive force of the walls of water. The word did not even appear in government guidelines until 2006, decades after plants — including the Fukushima Daiichi facility that firefighters are still struggling to get under control — began dotting the Japanese coastline."

Source: NY Times, 03/28/2011

"Amplify Energy Cashed Out Cleanup Fund While Racking Up Violations"

"Years before Amplify Energy made headlines for its ruptured pipeline that spewed oil into Southern California ocean waters in early October, the company’s owners were successfully fighting in court to change its obligation to maintain federally mandated funds for plugging and abandoning offshore oil and gas wells and equipment."

Source: Capital & Main, 10/27/2021

"La Niña Weather Pattern Likely to Prolong Western Drought, NOAA Says"

"For the second year in a row, the climate pattern known as La Niña has developed in the Pacific Ocean, which will likely prolong the severe drought in much of the Western United States this winter while bringing some relief to Northern California and the Pacific Northwest, government forecasters said Thursday."

Source: NYTimes, 10/22/2021

"Parade Of Powerful Storms To Bring Welcome Rain And Snow To California"

"A trio of moisture-rich storm systems are aimed at the West Coast and poised to dump exceptional precipitation totals in parts of California, Oregon and Washington state. Double-digit amounts are possible in some places by the end of the month, making a dent in the region’s prolonged drought-driven water deficit."

Source: Washington Post, 10/20/2021

Mapping Flood Risk — Research Outfit Offers Alternative Dataset

Climate change makes flooding — and flood reporting — increasingly likely, and yet government data on flood risk often falls short. The latest Reporter’s Toolbox offers an alternative, an ambitious, peer-reviewed dataset from a unique nonprofit research outfit that offers free data aggregated to the zip code, county and congressional district levels. More on the dataset and how to use it.

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