Africa

Author Shares Unorthodox Look at the Ways of Water

How water moves through the global ecosystem and shapes our landscapes is the subject of a must-read new book by writer Erica Gies, according to BookShelf editor Tom Henry. A significant part of water’s story is how humanity invariably fails when trying to manipulate it. But hope may reside with Gies’ various “water detectives,” who explore how to “let water go where it wants to go.”

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September 30, 2022

DEADLINE: World Science Forum 2022 Media for Social Justice Fellowships

"Science-interested" journalists anywhere in the world are invited to apply for an expenses-paid fellowship to attend this year's forum in Cape Town, South Africa, Dec 3-10, with flight reimbursement taking place on-site at WSF2022. Apply by Sep 30.

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"DRC To Auction Oil And Gas Permits In Endangered Gorilla Habitat"

"The Democratic Republic of the Congo has announced it will auction oil and gas permits in critically endangered gorilla habitat and the world’s largest tropical peatlands next week. The sale raises concerns about the credibility of a forest protection deal signed with the country by Boris Johnson at Cop26."

Source: Guardian, 07/25/2022

Can Qatar’s World Cup Really Be Carbon Neutral?

Qatar — the world’s highest carbon emitter on a per capita basis — made big promises in its winning bid for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. But will they deliver? Doha-based journalism professor Craig LaMay writes that while sports megaevent hosts face increasing pressure to address environmental concerns, critical coverage of their follow-through is challenging, especially in countries with no free press or public right to government information.

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"Will a Nile Canal Project Dry Up Africa’s Largest Wetland?"

"South Sudan is moving ahead with plans for a 240-mile canal to divert water from the White Nile and send it to Egypt. But critics warn the megaproject would desiccate the world’s second largest wetland, impacting its rich wildlife and the rains on which the region depends."

Source: YaleE360, 07/07/2022

How 'Rights of Nature' Is Recasting the Relationship Between Law and the Earth

In 2006, a local government council in Pennsylvania concerned about sewage sludge dumping enacted the Western legal system’s first formal “rights of nature” instrument. Today, numerous countries have laws recognizing specific rights or even legal personhood for nature. As legal expert Alice Bleby explains, this new perspective arises from a wide range of contexts and plays out in many different ways.

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