International

"Nuclear Rules in Japan Relied on Old Science"

"In the country that gave the world the word tsunami, the Japanese nuclear establishment largely disregarded the potentially destructive force of the walls of water. The word did not even appear in government guidelines until 2006, decades after plants — including the Fukushima Daiichi facility that firefighters are still struggling to get under control — began dotting the Japanese coastline."

Source: NY Times, 03/28/2011

"Bees Facing a Poisoned Spring"

"A new generation of pesticides is making honeybees far more susceptible to disease, even at tiny doses, and may be a clue to the mysterious colony collapse disorder that has devastated bees across the world, the US government's leading bee researcher has found. Yet the discovery has remained unpublished for nearly two years since it was made by the US Department of Agriculture's Bee Research Laboratory."

Source: UK Independent, 01/20/2011

"Italy Hosts A Climate-Focused G20 As Geopolitics Shift"

"The leaders of Russia and China aren’t coming. Turkey nearly set off a diplomatic incident on the eve of the meeting. And the United States, Australia and France will be at the same table for the first time since Washington pulled the rug out from under Paris’ $66 billion submarine deal Down Under."

Source: AP, 10/27/2021

"Attorneys Eye Glasgow Talks for Progress on Many Climate Issues"

"Corporate adaptation measures, carbon offset policy and new U.S. regulatory responses are among the top issues attorneys say they’re tracking at the upcoming United Nations climate talks.

The trajectory of the climate crisis is at stake in Glasgow, where more than 197 countries will gather starting Oct. 31 for the two-week COP26 summit. There, they’ll ratchet up their commitments to cutting greenhouse gas emissions under the 2015 Paris climate agreement and tie up its loose technical threads.

Source: Bloomberg Environment, 10/26/2021

Climate Change at Core of Beat Reporters’ Award-Winning Coverage

Beat reporters Hal Bernton and Mark Kaufman both found the dramatic changes wrought by climate change to be at the center of their coverage — as their work was elevated to prize-winning heights. Bernton, covering climate impacts in northwestern Alaska at a large newspaper, and Kaufman, covering CO2 globally for a digital platform, talk about the lessons of their recent beat coverage with SEJournal’s Inside Story.

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