Environmental Justice

"Poor Neighborhoods Feel Brunt Of Rising Heat. Cities Are Mapping Them"

"This summer volunteers are fanning out in 13 cities across the U.S. to — quite literally — take the temperature of their neighborhoods. It's part of a project to help protect people as the world warms, and in many places it's highlighting how the poorest areas suffer most from rising urban heat."

Source: NPR, 08/31/2020

Millions Of Pounds Of Extra Pollution Were Released Before Laura Hit

"Hurricane Laura tore through a region that is home to dozens of major oil refineries, petrochemical plants and plastics facilities. Now, residents could be breathing dangerously polluted air from those sites, public health experts and local advocates say."

Source: NPR, 08/31/2020

"Environmental Justice Becomes Part of California City Planning"

"More than 140 cities and counties in California intend to update their long-term plans over the next two years to include environmental justice, meaning air pollution, water quality, and other factors affecting disadvantaged communities would get a closer look."

Source: Bloomberg Environment, 08/27/2020

"Heat, Smoke and Covid Are Battering the Workers Who Feed America"

"STOCKTON, Calif — Work began in the dark. At 4 a.m., Briseida Flores could make out a fire burning in the distance. Floodlights illuminated the fields. And shoulder to shoulder with dozens of others, Ms. Flores pushed into the rows of corn. Swiftly, they plucked. One after the other. First under the lights, then by the first rays of daylight."

Source: NYTimes, 08/26/2020

Indigenous 'Women Warriors' Fight for Amazon Forest Conservation

"On an early December morning last year in the state of Maranhão, Brazil, half a dozen members of the Indigenous Guajajara people packed their bags with food, maps and drone equipment to get ready for a patrol. They said goodbye to their children, uncertain when, or whether, they would see them again. Then, they hoisted their bags over their shoulders and set out to patrol a section of the 173,000 hectares (428,000 acres) of the primary rainforest they call home."

Source: Mongabay, 08/25/2020

How Maryland's Trash-Burning Bias Galvanized Activists in Baltimore

"Shashawnda Campbell became an environmental activist at 15, when she learned that a company had proposed building the country's largest waste-to-energy incinerator less than a mile from her high school, in the Curtis Bay section of Baltimore."

Source: InsideClimate News, 08/25/2020

"How Decades of Racist Housing Policy Left Neighborhoods Sweltering"

"In the 1930s, federal officials redlined these neighborhoods in Richmond, Va., marking them as risky investments because residents were Black. Today, they are some of the hottest parts of town in the summer, with few trees and an abundance of heat-trapping pavement."

Source: NYTimes, 08/25/2020

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