Environmental Health

"In Industry’s Shadow: After Years of Illness, Family Seeks Answers"

The Martins, a Latino family who live in Maywood, California, 10 minutes from downtown Los Angeles amid a sea of heavy industry, suffered from a variety of chronic sicknesses. Test results finally showed "The Martin family had traces of eight dangerous heavy metals and 17 industrial byproducts in their bodies. Levels of arsenic, chromium, mercury, manganese and vanadium were far higher than for most Americans."

Source: California Watch, 11/07/2011

"The Conversation: Pink Inc. Has Many Starting To See Red"

"All this month [October], the market has been saturated with pink-ribbon products sold in the name of breast cancer awareness, some with dubious ties to good health. How about some pink-certified wine? Or how about a Smith & Wesson handgun with a pink grip and engraved ribbon insignia?

Source: Sacramento Bee, 11/03/2011

Feds Glossed Over Cancer Concerns in Rush for Airport X-Ray Scanners

"Today, the United States has begun marching millions of airline passengers through the X-ray body scanners, parting ways with countries in Europe and elsewhere that have concluded that such widespread use of even low-level radiation poses an unacceptable health risk. The government is rolling out the X-ray scanners despite having a safer alternative that the Transportation Security Administration says is also highly effective."

Source: ProPublica, 11/02/2011

"U.S. To Require Details Of Fracking On Federal Land"

"The Interior Department plans to issue a proposal soon forcing companies to reveal the chemicals they use in the so-called fracking drilling process on federal lands, as the Obama administration responds to public safety concerns over the shale exploration boom."

Source: Reuters, 11/01/2011

"On Edge of Paradise, Coachella Workers Live in Grim Conditions"

"THERMAL – At one end of Avenue 54, a road slicing through some of the most fertile land in the United States, resides the California of the popular imagination: a place of Bermuda shorts, putting greens and picture-window champagne dinners overlooking the infinity pool.

Source: California Watch, 10/25/2011

"Md. Court Strikes Down Landlord Protection in Lead Paint Law"

"Maryland's highest court struck down Monday a key provision of state law that shielded owners of older rental housing from civil lawsuits -- and potentially costly payments to victims -- if they took precautions to protect children in their units from lead-paint poisoning."

Source: Baltimore Sun, 10/25/2011

40,000 Dallas-Fort Worth Children Under 6 Have Lead in Blood: Data

"The headlines have focused on Frisco, where a battery-recycling plant emits too much lead. But the dangers go far beyond Frisco’s backyard. In cities such as Dallas and Fort Worth, particles from leaded gasoline banned decades ago still contaminate the soil."

Source: Dallas Morning News, 10/24/2011

"CDC: Autism Diagnoses Growing By 10 To 17 Percent Annually"

"The figure is so astounding it appears to be a misprint at first glance. One in 110. That's the number of American children living with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), based on the most recently published estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)."

Source: Scranton Times-Tribune, 10/24/2011

"Girls Exposed in Womb to BPA Have Risk of Behavior Problems"

"The research showed that hyperactive, anxious, aggressive and depressed behavior was more common in 3-year-old girls who were exposed in the womb to bisphenol-A than in boys of the same age. No association was seen between bisphenol-A levels during later childhood and behavior for either gender, according to the study released today by the journal Pediatrics."

Source: Bloomberg, 10/24/2011

Calif. Central Valley Study Links ER Visits With Bad Air Days

"Children's asthma-related emergency room visits rise in the San Joaquin Valley at a similar rate as fine particulate levels do -- even on days where air quality is considered in the moderate range.

That's a key finding of a yearlong study by the Central Valley Health Policy Institute at Fresno State, which examined the short-term impacts of air quality changes in Bakersfield, Fresno and Modesto.

Although nationwide studies have found similar connections between heightened pollution and hospital visits, the report is the first of its kind using valley-specific data.

Source: Bakersfield Californian, 10/19/2011

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